FAQs

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. What does Learn to Read do?
  2. How does Learn to Read get students?
  3. What do Learn to Read tutors do?
  4. How much time is involved in tutoring a student?
  5. Does Learn to Read offer training to tutors?
  6. Where do the tutors meet with their students?
  7. What types of materials do the tutors use with their students?
  8. Does Learn to Read provide books and other training materials?
  9. Other than tutoring, does Learn to Read offer other volunteer opportunities?
  10. How many tutors and students does Learn to Read have?
  11. What are the benefits of becoming involved with Learn to Read?
  12. How is Learn to Read funded?
  13. How large a problem is illiteracy?
  14. How does illiteracy affect our community?
  15. How can I help?
    1. What does Learn to Read do?

Learn to Read provides free, one-on-one instruction to adults in basic reading and writing, English for speakers of other languages, and GED preparation. We are the only provider of free, one-on-one adult literacy instruction in Escambia and Santa Rosa Counties, Florida.

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    1. How does Learn to Read get students?

Many students are referred to us by governmental agencies, educational institutions, nonprofit organizations, businesses, and the students’ friends and families. Students also learn about us from our promotional materials and public service announcements.

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    1. What do Learn to Read tutors do?

Using learning materials available from Learn to Read, tutors work one-on-one with adult learners to improve the learners’ literacy skills.

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    1. How much time is involved in tutoring a student?

Generally, tutors meet with their students twice a week for about 1.5 hours per session.

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    1. Does Learn to Read offer training to tutors?

Yes. Learn to Read offers training to new tutors as well as in-service training to certified tutors. New tutors must complete a 4 to 5 hour literacy training session at our office. This basic training is offered as needed. Call our office 850-432-4347 to arrange for a training session.

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    1. Where do the tutors meet with their students?

Some tutors meet with their students in the classroom area of the Learn to Read office. There are cubicles, computers, dry-erase boards, and materials to use with students in the office. Tutors and students also meet at other locations such as schools and churches in Escambia and Santa Rosa Counties. We have a list of about forty-five locations that are available for tutoring.

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    1. What types of materials do the tutors use with their students?

Generally, Learn to Read tutors use materials produced by New Readers Press, the publishing division of ProLiteracy Worldwide. Tutors learn how to use these materials during training sessions for new tutors.

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    1. Does Learn to Read provide books and other learning materials?

Yes. We have a resource library in the Learn to Read office from which tutors may obtain books, teachers’ manuals, and other materials. Tutors learn to use these materials during the training for new tutors.

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    1. Are other volunteer opportunities available?

Yes. Learn to Read needs volunteers to help with special events and fundraising activities.

We are currently recruiting help with:

  • our biggest fundraiser, Scrabble Soiree which will take place in September 2015
  • our Blue Wahoo parking lot fundraiser, the home stand week of August 18th – 22nd

Five volunteers are need each of the five game nights to collect parking fees and direct cars in the main parking lot. 20% of parking fees go to Learn to Read. Thanks Blue Wahoos.

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    1. How many tutors and students does Learn to Read have?

We currently average between 60 to 70 student/tutors pairs meeting regularly. (Some tutors meet with more than one student.) We hope to increase the number of students and tutors by ten percent in the next couple of years.

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    1. What are the benefits of becoming involved with Learn to Read?

Here’s what some of our tutors say about the benefits of tutoring:

My student is a special joy in my life. I’ve seen his self-esteem grow because he’s proven to himself that there’s no limit to what he can accomplish.

Tutoring a student at Learn to Read has allowed me the opportunity to help a young man grow personally. It has afforded me the wonderful experience of being able to influence a young person’s achievements as he learns to read.

When I see the confidence gained by my student in the process of learning and finally being able to read like others, it makes my heart happy. Imagine how it must feel to him when he breaks that barrier!

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    1. How is Learn to Read funded?

Learn to Read receives contributions and grants from individuals, businesses, foundations, and non-profit organizations. We also engage in various fundraising activities.

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    1. How large a problem is illiteracy?

Illiteracy is a huge problem:

        • 43% of adults are functionally illiterate.
        • 17% of adults read below basic level.
        • 20% of Americans cannot read well enough to fill out a simple job application.
        • 50% of all calls to poison hotlines are made by people who cannot read the labels on the containers.
        • 10% of preschool children live in homes without a literate adult.
        • 20% of adults cannot write a check or address a letter properly.

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    1. How does illiteracy affect our community?

The consequences of illiteracy include lower employment, lower wages, greater dependence on social services, higher health costs, more public school dropouts, and more prison repeat offenders. American businesses spend $16.6 billion each year to train employees who don’t have the reading skills they need. That cost is passed on to consumers.

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    1. How can I help?

        • Complete our workshop and become a certified tutor.
        • Volunteer for special events.
        • Refer someone you know who needs help with reading and writing skills.
        • Make a donation.
        • Become an advocate to help educate the community about literacy.

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